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Author Topic: Maltby  (Read 1176 times)
astute observer
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« on: June 09, 2011, 03:46:53 AM »

I mentioned in one of the other forums that I had purchased an Illinois-made rifle last Sunday.  A bit more about it:

One of Illinois most noteworthy  gunmakers during the Mid-19th Century, was Jasper Adalmon Maltby, who made rifles in Galena, Jo Daviess County, Illinois, 1850 - 1861. Born in Kingsville, Ashtabula County. Ohio, in 1826, Maltby served in the Mexican War with some distinction, and was severely wounded in the Battle of Chapultepec. He was mustered out on August 3, 1848.  By 1849, he was working as a gunsmith in the shop of Peacock & Thatcher, in Chicago, Illinois. The following year, he established his own shop in Galena, Illinois, where he produced heavy, large caliber "Plains rifles" for the Western trade. He also made some fine target rifles, including some with telescopic sights of his own manufacture.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Maltby enlisted in the 45th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was appointed its lieutenant colonel on Dec 26, 1861. He bacame a full colonel on Nov 29, 1862, and was promoted to Brigadier General on August 4, 1863. He was one of nine Union Generals from Galena, Illinois, the most famous of whom was Ulysses S. Grant. Maltby  took part in the Siege of Vicksburg, and was appointed commander over sevearal counties in Mississippi in 1865. He remained in Vicksburg after the end of the war, and was appointed its mayor in September of 1867. He died three months later of yellow fever.


Because he was a maker of Plains rifles, and because of his Civil War history, his guns are quite desireable. I already had five Maltby rifles, so this one is my sixth.  Unfortunately, it has been modified at a later date, though probably no later than the 1880's. It has been re-bored into a 20 gauge shotgun, having originally been a rifle of about .40 caliber. The double-set triggers were also modified to a single trigger, which a shotgun would require. Otherwise, the gun is quite original and in pretty decent condition. The alterations were definitely done by a professional gunsmith of the period, at a customer's request.

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astute observer
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« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2011, 05:26:58 PM »

I had this gun at Friendship with me.  My collector friends all pretty much agreed with my thinking on this piece. Although it could be restored to the way it was originally built, the alterations are now part of its history, and we will leave it as-is.

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DE
Queen of Questions
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« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2011, 10:49:15 AM »

I understand 'an original' ...but the fact that it was altered in the 1880's...still is so far back in history, I would have considered it a find!  grinning-smiley-003

Do you believe in ghosts/spirits, Astute? ...do you ever feel your getting more than just that *item* you purchased?

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astute observer
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2011, 03:40:38 AM »

No, I don't believe that I own any "haunted" guns, but I do sometimes look at them and think "if only this could talk".

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